3/22/10

In the news: Tools in sea lamprey fight adapted for Asian carp

From the Chicago Tribune:
The forecast was grim.

A parasitic invasive species that fed on healthy trout, salmon and catfish had entered the Great Lakes through its shipping canals, quickly asserted its dominance, and pushed the region's commercial and sport fishing industries to the brink.

The invader was the sea lamprey, a razor-toothed, eel-like monster that attaches itself to large fish and sucks the life out of them. And in the 1940s, with no known predators and no clear road map to stop them, many feared the sea lamprey would take over the largest freshwater body in the world.

More than 50 years after biologists launched an all-out assault on the sea lamprey — among the most intensive and costly invasive species eradication efforts in history — the war is all but over. With science, money and muscle, biologists have reduced the sea lamprey population by 90 percent and restored the natural balance to the Great Lakes.

Now, many of the tools scientists used to save the lakes' from the sea lamprey will be part of their defense against the Asian carp, the next in a long line of invasive species predicted to forever change life in the Great Lakes. Read more.

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